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Sesame-Crusted Tuna Sushi Bowl

Food design

DSC_0261recettebilingueIf I could snap my fingers and be instantly transported to another country, I’d visit Japan. For as long as I can remember, I’ve been fascinated with this country and its incredibly rich culture. Be it art, architecture, food, landscapes and gardens… everything is aesthetically pleasing! From the outside, it is refinement at its finest. It is perfection and sophistication in every detail, and it is incredibly interesting to me.

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Love and Excisions

Romance time

Tales for Life

By Vladimir Volegov By Vladimir Volegov

Tomorrow I’ll roll out of bed before 6:30 so I can pick up my dear friend on the other side of the city, then ferry her back my way to the hospital. I’m doing this because I have so cared about her for fifteen years. There is a grab bag of chortles and sighs to sort through as I consider what’s ahead for her. She lives alone now. How few people we might call upon; our neighbors are usually not the first choices for such events. Just as she has been with me through upheavals and victories, I am for her. For one thing, she extended herself immediately at a women’s recovery meeting when I was in need of a particularly female place of both daring tales and ready kindnesses. It became obvious the meeting was exceptional and her rhapsody of laughter and open-heartedness made a real…

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We’re all made of chemicals

The subject

It's Chemistry Time

chemistry time

When I was walking through what should remain an unnamed large shopping centre in East London the other day, I was approached by a lovely lady selling lotions and cosmetics. She asked me if I wanted to try out their new hand lotion. She didn’t need to ask twice: long lab hours wearing different types of gloves don’t make for baby-soft skin. While going through her speech, the sales lady put particular emphasis on the fact that all her products were completely “chemical-free”. I was taken aback: what did that mean? Was she putting the complete and utter void on my hands in front of my very eyes? Because that was the only thing I could imagine in the world that wasn’t made of chemicals, i.e. atoms, molecules, matter of some sort.

all-natural banana Bananananana

A few years back, the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) had offered a £1 million bounty for…

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Legacies of British Slave Ownership: Thoughts on British Imperial History and Public Memory

Information

JHIBlog

by Emily Rutherford

Last week, I was meant to be teaching the women’s suffrage movement to my modern British history discussion section, but my students only wanted to talk about one thing: Prime Minister David Cameron visited Jamaica last week, but was dismissive of calls from prominent Jamaican politicians and public figures that Britain pay reparations to Jamaica and other West Indian nations whose people were the victims of Britain’s eighteenth- and nineteenth-century slave trade. My students were interested in this, I suspect, because they are of a generation of American and international students who care deeply about imperial and postcolonial history, and see a greater understanding of empire (and its sins) as a key reason to study British history. If you count the US (as we should) as a former British colony, nearly everyone enrolled in the lecture course for which I TA has a heritage that is somehow…

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My Mt. Everest

the biggest ever

The Wallflower Wanderer

The tallest, fiercest beast of rock, ice and snow on the planet goes by many names. 

If you’re the average Nepali, you’ve grown up calling it Sagarmāthā, meaning “forehead in the sky.” If you’re a native speaker of the Tibetan languages, it is the “mother of the world” or, Chomolungma. But those of us who have not had the rare pleasure of casting our eyes from a young age upward toward the behemoth, which rises like a ghost from the Mahalangur mountain range — we know it as Mt. Everest.

Mt. Everest-1-2


It’s 5:45am and I’m making my way in darkness toward the nearest main road from my Airbnb in the Lainchaur neighborhood of Kathmandu.

The simple but sturdy four-story concrete home is buried deep in a pocket of squiggling half-paved, half-dirt streets that don’t appear to have names. Many are scarcely wide enough for a single car to pass people on foot.

Even at this early hour, when I reach the big…

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photo essay: the hidden graffiti of bandra

The Art of a DRAW

rama arya's blog

nagranalane_graffiti1
The contemplating sage at Nagrana Lane

I moved to Bombay, sorry Mumbai, this February. And I chose Bandra as my home. It was one of those ‘destined’ moves as I like to term it. 🙂

Bandra grows on you. It slowly becomes the center of your life, and you start believing that there is no other world outside of it; an aberration one slowly and gleefully slips into.

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“Indigenizing the Academy” without Indigenous people: who can teach our stories?

Dhope…help me improve

Moontime Warrior

“The Indigenous person engages in philosophy by thoughtfully examining the world. The outsider examines Indigenous philosophy by thoughtfully interacting with the Indigenous philosopher.”

— Thurman Lee Hester Jr. and Dennis McPherson, “The Euro-American Philosophical Tradition and its Ability to Examine Indigenous Philosophy”1

With the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report on residential schools in June 2015, “Indigenizing the Academy” is a hot topic in Canadian universities. As institutions explore the introduction of Indigenous content, we have to question what is defined as Indigenous content, who this content serves, and how the pursuit of “indigenizing the academy” can easily become exploitative.

In 2013, I helped put together a new syllabus for an Indigenous Philosophy class at my university. The philosophy department wouldn’t consider allowing someone without a PhD in philosophy teach this course, but pairing an Indigenous undergrad with a white philosophy professor was, apparently, acceptable. (Oh, the power…

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